Haiku

History Haiku Saturday – September 23 – The birth of John Coltrane, 1926

JohnColtraneBirth.jpgHeroin, cancer – 
nothing could stop your prayer:
a saint of music. 

The history haiku for today is to honor the birth of the legendary jazz musician John Coltrane (1926 – 1967). He struggled with addiction as a young man, and sadly, his career was cut short by liver cancer at the age of 40, but he had an outsized impact on jazz and music in general. Especially towards the end of his life, he believed his music had a spiritual dimension, one that transcended any particular religion and tended towards a universalism.

John Coltrane has made an appearance here on Illustrated Poetry before – in an illustration of the poem In Memoriam John Coltrane by Michael Stillman. I’ve posted it below (or click here to go to the original post from 2014).  Have a great weekend!
MemoriamJohnColtrane

Short Poem Saturday – Haiku by Knoll

LadyBugsHaiku_KnollGoing back through the archives, I found this illustration I did last year and I couldn’t resist reposting it. Ms. Knoll’s haiku has the same positive effect on me it always has – and with the front page of the news pretty much universally gloomy, I didn’t think it hurt to post a happy, fun poem. I’m pleased to say Ms. Knoll continues to be extremely active, with a forthcoming poetry book for June 2017 and lots of new poetry focused on social justice and current issues. She always has new stuff happening – her website: http://triciaknoll.com/

Original text of the post:
This haiku puts a grin on my face every time I read it. And it never fails to launch me on an extended trip down memory lane as well – from the greenhouse in my grandparents’ backyard to one I visited once in Iceland. I consider this one of the superpowers of the haiku: they are a reservoir of memories stored in present tense words. Ms. Tricia Knoll is an award-winning poet working and living in Portland, Oregon. Her website, triciaknoll.com, has more of her wonderful haiku as well as links to many of her published poems and books – I definitely recommend a visit! Painting (acrylic on cardboard), digital collage, and composition by me. Have a wonderful weekend!

Short Poem Saturday – Haiku – Roig

photograph of Roig Haiku collageunleaf me and go
your shadows are ghosting me
lost blurred indistinct
– Kerfe Roig

I have been introduced to so many of you through Ms. Kerfe Roig’s amazing collaborative blog, Method Two Madness, and vice versa, that it almost doesn’t need an introduction. But if by chance you found your way to Illustrated Poetry by another means, I do strongly recommend you head over to Ms. Roig’s blog and check out the art and poetry posted daily by both Kerfe and her best friend Nina.

Ms. Roig sent me this haiku way back last July, in preparation for a possible series on seasonal transitions. I knew immediately what I wanted to do for an illustration – a textured, layered collage. But two things happened on the way to this post: I needed to take my blogging hiatus and I also kept wondering, “how do I photograph/scan/etc that piece for display on the internet?” These last few weeks, I have been making a lot of new starts, and I am so glad I made this one of them. The world is going through so many transitions, and while they may not be seasonal, this poem still feels timely. Haiku by Kerfe Roig, collage (mixed media on cardboard) by me.

Short Poem Saturday – Corn Moon – Summers

KXSX3001.jpgThis was an illustration I did last year, finishing it before I had to take my hiatus from this blog. I was in a “no outline” phase, practicing building up an image from repeated mark-making.

Although a corn moon usually refers to the full moon in September, at least there is the lunar connection for the Lunar New Year today. My apologies to Mr. Summers for the long delay between our correspondence and this post! Mr. Summers is a much decorated poet in many of the Japanese traditions. His personal blog, Area 17, can be found here! He also runs an organization, With Words, that brings poetry workshops into schools and to the public in the U.K.

Drawing (ink on paper) by me. Happy New Year to all!

Double Original Friday – Motto of the Grand Old Order of Molluscs and Chelonii

turtlesnailhaikuchallengeI wrote this haiku in response to a Ronovan Writes Haiku Challenge (if you don’t know about these, I do recommend them) almost two years ago – and it is amazing to me that it’s been that long. But it is still one of my favorite haiku I’ve written, as it satisfies the science nerd inside of me, so I am reposting it! The challenge words way back then were “Snail” and “Turtle” and the first thing I thought of was that they both have shells, albeit made of very different materials. “Molluscs” and “Chelonii” are the taxonomic Orders of snails and turtles, respectively. Poem and photo (one from a long ago trip to Sequoia National Park) by me. Have a wonderful Friday!

Short Poem Saturday – Haiku by Knoll

LadyBugsHaiku_KnollThis haiku puts a grin on my face every time I read it. And it never fails to launch me on an extended trip down memory lane as well – from the greenhouse in my grandparents’ backyard to one I visited once in Iceland. I consider this one of the superpowers of the haiku: they are a reservoir of memories stored in present tense words. Ms. Tricia Knoll is an award-winning poet working and living in Portland, Oregon. Her website, triciaknoll.com, has more of her wonderful haiku as well as links to many of her published poems and books – I definitely recommend a visit! Painting (acrylic on cardboard), digital collage, and composition by me. Have a wonderful weekend!

Short Poem Saturday – Don’t Worry, Spiders – Issa

Dontworry_II“Don’t Worry, Spiders” was the very first haiku I posted on Illustrated Poetry! At the time, I paired it with a photograph I had taken of a brightly lit window at night – I thought of it like a Motel 6 for spiders. I decided to revisit the haiku and try it with something different: much more abstract and colorful (and perhaps from the spider’s perspective?) Haiku by Kobayashi Issa (1763 – 1828), painting (acrylic on illustration board), and composition by me. Have a great weekend! Enjoy!

Old Poem Saturday – A Hallowe’en Haiku – Hoyt

HalloweenHoytHaikuI did want to feature a new illustrated Halloween poem this year, and Mr. Clement Hoyt’s “Hallowe’en Mask” haiku is perfect for the occasion. Mr. Hoyt is listed as an influential American haiku poet in numerous sources, but very little information about him is available – so a bit of poetry mystery for Halloween as well! “Hallowe’en Mask” was published in 1963. Photograph and composition by me.

 

Double Original Friday – Wakuwafu Award

A little more than a week ago I was nominated by Little Monster Girl for the Wakuwafu Award! A hearty thank you to Zela and friends for the nomination. If you like a little adventure, a lot of fun, and don’t always want your comics to be G-rated, then definitely head over to LMG Comics and follow along!

The Wakuwafu Award was started this month by a pair of anime bloggers at the blog Wakuwafu and I felt in the spirit of the visual arts nature of their award and blog and the fact it is double original Friday to have a little illustrated poetry fun with it. Everything comes in threes here!

1) Three things about myself, as a haiku:

A Marcy Haiku

Pirate cat owner,

but does not have pierced ears.

Does adore hummus.

(non haiku commentary – 1) I am the proud owner of a one-eyed cat, we adopted him that way, so we don’t know how he lost his eye – he will be featured on Silent Sunday, so stay tuned. 2) Just never got around to it, but that doesn’t stop distant relatives from giving me earrings. 3) I will eat it straight out of the container if no one is looking. Crackers only dilute the experience.)

2) Answer three questions posed by your nominator:

a) What inspired you to start blogging?

      I wanted a way to meet other artists and poets, gain some confidence, and provide myself a motivation/schedule for producing new work (I work well with deadlines/schedules). I would say that blogging at here via WordPress has way exceeded all of my expectations and has really come to be a joy in my life.

b) What time is it right now?

      11:48 am

c) Do you have a favorite pair of shoes? Can/will you share a pic of them?

     I do have a favorite pair, they are brown Børn short boots, and I will illustrate one for you as the art half of the double original Friday:

IMG_1525

3. Three questions for my nominees:

a) What has surprised you most about blogging and/or sharing your artwork online?

b) What does poetry mean to you? (What is poetry, when you come right down to it?)

c) What meal (or snack/drink/food related ritual) do you most look forward to each day?

4. Three Nominees:

My award nominations come with a no-strings-attached clause. My main purpose is always to send folks to go see bloggers who are doing fun/unique/artistic/amazing things on their blogs and are also in the early-ish stages of building a following. If they take up the award, that’s fantastic, but there is never an expectation on my part. I just hope folks mosey on over to their sites and enjoy their work as much as I do. Okay! I went with a visual/comic/doodle theme:

a) Silence Killed the Dinosaurs – I have only recently become acquainted with this awesome comic, but I am so glad I have! A comic of spiders reenacting Pride and Prejudice? Yes, please!

b) Jennifer Barrile – Artist. Illustrator. Muralist. Ms. Barrile’s sketchbooks are a source of beautiful and inspiring artwork, quotes, and poetry too!

c) Monday Tuesday Wednesday – Ms. Sharon Mann’s artwork and doodles are gorgeous and she recently convinced me to buy some Mineral paper to try to get colors as vibrant as hers. I also appreciate the schedule as the title and inspiration of her blog! Especially since Monday’s tend to be my least creative days!

Thanks again, Little Monster Girl, for the nomination and I hope everyone has a great weekend!

Old Poem Saturday – !blac – Cummings

!blac_cummings“!blac” by E.E. Cummings is a very short poem that takes a bit of “activation energy” to read the first time – but it rewards your hard work. In my research on the poem, I found several sources that pointed out its haiku-like qualities: from the vertical composition akin to Japanese scrolls to the three “periods” or lines you get if you render it horizontally. It is yet another dimension to this so visual of poems. Drawing (ink on paper) and composition by me – inspired by an original design by Emily Grossman. Have a great weekend!