birds

August Draw A Bird Day – The Emperor

TheEmperorI wanted to reveal the next drawing in my “Major Arcana” series for August’s Draw-A-Bird Day. Officially, Draw-A-Bird Day is April 8th each year: you can visit the D.A.B.D. website here – thank you to M.R. Emberson of A-Wing and A-Away for introducing us to it!  A number of artist-bloggers here on Word Press have been celebrating it by posting a bird drawing on the 8th of every month. Laura at Create Art Every Day is hosting this month’s birdy gathering! Thank you, Laura!

The Emperor is a Jabiru stork, one of the largest birds in South America: large males can stand 5 feet tall and have a 9 foot wingspan. They eat small animals of almost any variety – frogs, lizards, crustaceans, and even mice and other birds. Drawing (colored pencil and ink on paper) by me. Have a Happy Draw-A-Bird-Day! If you’d like to see the other two drawings in my bird themed Major Arcana series: The Tower and The Wheel of Fortune.

Illustration Friday – The Tower

TheTowerWell, this is my second entry for the Draw-A-Bird Day that is on the 8th of every month. Clearly I don’t do well with deadlines! I chose a Western Grebe this month. The scene is sadly one I personally witnessed not long ago on the beach. I see multiple groups of volunteers regularly cleaning this stretch of beach, which is in a state reserve, bags full of trash – and yet more debris keeps coming every day. I decided to keep my theme of the major arcana – perhaps I will wind up with a tarot deck of Draw-A-Bird Day art! Drawing (colored pencil and pen on paper) and composition by me. If you’d like to see my first entry for Draw-A-Bird Day, click here. Ms. Laura of the fabulous Create Art Everyday blog is the curator of Draw-A-Bird Day, check it out and join in (even if you are chronically late like me).

 

Double Original Friday – an ode

IMG_1256The August challenge over at Red String Paper Cuts was to write an ode to future or long term goals. When proposing the challenge, site co-founder Jessie Gutierrez acknowledges that there is a disconnect between the standard content of an ode and something that hasn’t happened yet. I decided to write the ode about the future in general and good fortune we have to be able to wake up each day. The ink sketch is of a real bird that keeps visiting my father’s bird feeder. She is one tough house finch – one eye and one foot are severely damaged, but she returns each day and is quite active. Poem (read the whole thing here!), drawing, and composition by me – have a great weekend!